Trump’s Inauguration Promises To Set Records For Protests

Undocumented and unafraid protest of Donald Trump

Trump is going to be President, and it’s a bitter pill for the majority of Americans. Protests all over the country have done nothing to prevent the inevitable. Protests directed at the Electoral College, asking them to do their duty also failed. They have proven without any shadow of a doubt that they are outdated and should be eliminated, a useless process and remnant of slavery.

In the past, many Presidents have been protested, both Republican and Democrat. That includes President Andrew Jackson, President John F. Kennedy, President Richard Nixon, President Jimmy Carter, President Bill Clinton, President George W. Bush, President Barack Obama, and candidate Mitt Romney.

Now groups are coming together to make Trump’s Inauguration on January 20th notable for widespread protests and boycotts too. With social media and technology as prevalent as it is today, the protests stand to be that much bigger and more visible. Michael Moore will be leading the national protests. He’s been a clear leader to many progressives and liberals throughout the Trump campaign, and was one of the few to have accurately predicted this would happen with his ‘5 Reasons Why Trump Will Win.’  With a following of millions, he is sure to make an impact on Inauguration day. His event can be found using the hashtag of #DISRUPTJ20 or at the website. 

‘If by some awful happenstance Trump shows up to be sworn in on January 20th, I will be there helping lead the national protest and non-violently disrupting the Inauguration of a man no one other than the electoral college elected — and I’ll also be doing my own thing as a private citizen (activities I won’t disclose now),’ wrote Moore in a letter to the Hollywood Reporter. 

Here is a shortlist (but certainly not comprehensive) of more protests planned so far for Inauguration day, January 20th, 2017:

  1. Freedom United Concert to raise money for progressive causes and to ‘compete directly with the inauguration.’ (Has almost 50,000 signatures so far)
  2. A call for a national ‘Sick Out’ day. It ‘would be a commitment not to go to work or buy anything on January 20. It would not focus on any single cause or demand; instead, it would be a show of our collective power in opposition to Trump’s extremism.’
  3. Not a protest but perhaps karma: The oath of office is to be administered by Republican Chief Justice John Roberts. Trump has described Justice Roberts as a ‘disaster’ and a ‘nightmare’ since Justice Roberts made the Affordable Care Act possible. It’s also possible the Bush family will skip the event, a snub and a show of disapproval in itself.
  4. Anna Galland, executive director of MoveOn.org, expects thousands or even millions of peaceful protests around the Inauguration. ‘We did three hundred and fifty peaceful gatherings less than twenty-four hours after the election results were announced. Then over the weekend you saw tens of thousands of people marching in the streets,’ Galland told the New Yorker.
  5. The Women’s March on Washington will be on on January 21st. Women from all over America will be on the National Mall to ‘send a bold message to our new administration on their first day in office, and to the world that women’s rights are human rights,’ according to the event’s official website. It’s also expected to be the biggest demonstration. Marches in cities around the country are also planned, called ‘Sister Marches.’
  6. Al Sharpton is planning a major protest near the Martin Luther King, Jr. memorial called the ‘We Shall Not Be Moved March’ on January 14th. ‘We may have lost, but we have not lost the ethics and commitment America has to the principles of civil and human rights for all,’ Sharpton said in a notice to Trump.
  7. The Act Now to Stop War and End Racism (ANSWER) Coalition is planning a ‘massive demonstration along Pennsylvania Avenue.’
  8. Calls for having a Star Wars marathon or similar movie-watching day, avoiding any inauguration news or coverage of any kind.
  9. Calls asking for bands to perform in a televised ‘Liberty Concert’ to draw attention away from the Inauguration.
  10. Public statements from celebrities and politicians that they will not be in attendance, including Luis V. Gutierrez, Congressman from IL and other celebrities

11. The call to change profile pictures on social media to reflect a protest, as well as a boycott of any advertisers who buy time during the inauguration.

12. The lack of musical talent willing to perform for the inauguration, or even a marching band speaks musical volumes.

13. And as always, Twitter will weigh in with hashtags like #inauguration #notmypresident #theresistance #resist #inaugurationprotest #MarchOnWashington #AntiTrump #trumpprotest #occupyinauguration

Worldwide protests are not included in this list, but are likely as well.

Featured image from Wikimedia Commons: Demonstrators protesting the election of Donald Trump chanted “Undocumented and unafraid” as they marched near the White House in Washington, D.C., Nov. 10, 2016. (Jesusemen Oni/VOA)

About Matthew Silvan 166 Articles
Matthew Silvan is a gay man from the American South who has spent years fighting against the scapegoating and demonization imposed on the LGBT community by Republicans and religious hypocrites and zealots. His writing reflects the constant struggle to overcome the inequality and discrimination still rampant in America. He is an advocate for diversity and progress, with a passion for nature and preserving the environment, who also tends to approach things in a lighthearted way despite it all.