Russian Hackers Target American Journalists, Clinton Campaign Suspects Sabotage

On August 23, 2016, CNN reported that hackers said to be working for Russian intelligence officials have targeted reporters at The New York Times and other media outlets in recent months and that the matter is being investigated by the FBI and other U.S. security agencies. According to FBI spokespeople, the cyberattacks on the journalists are linked to hacks that have been directed at organizations affiliated with the Democratic Party.

Despite the individual reporters being targeted, New York Times spokeswoman Eileen Murphy noted:

“We are constantly monitoring our systems with the latest available intelligence and tools. We have seen no evidence that any of our internal systems, including our systems in the Moscow bureau, have been breached or compromised.”

Representatives for Hillary Clinton’s Presidential campaign believe that the motive behind the hacks is to undermine the Democratic Party for the benefit of electing of Republican candidate Donald Trump as President of the United States. Indeed this is plausible, as on July 27, 2016, during a press conference in Doral, Florida, Trump said:

“Russia, if you’re listening, I hope you’ll be able to find the 30,000 emails that are missing [from Hillary Clinton’s private email server]. I think you’ll probably be rewarded mightily by our press.”

Only two days later, The New York Times reported that computer systems used by Hillary Clinton’s campaign were hacked and that the FBI traced the attacks to “Fancy Bear,” an entity connected to the G.R.U., the Russian military intelligence service. As the story broke, reports surfaced that Trump had corresponded with Russian President Vladimir Putin around the time of the Miss Universe Pageant in Moscow in 2013, despite the fact that during the Florida press conference Trump claimed he never met Putin. Around the same time, it came to light that Donald Trump, due to an increased debt load over the course of his campaign, has become increasingly reliant upon money from Russian investors with connections to Vladimir Putin.

 

Featured Images via Wikicommons