The Problem With Trump’s Voter Fraud Claims Is That They’re Lies (Video)

On January 26, 2017, CNN reported that White House press secretary Sean Spicer announced that President Donald Trump would sign an executive order calling for a probe into alleged voter fraud either the following day or the next day. The news came a day after Donald Trump offered his solution in search of a problem via Twitter.

During a reception in the White House’s State Dining Room on January 23, President Donald Trump whined to the House and Senate leaders gathered that he would have won the popular vote if not for the three million to five million ballots cast by “illegals,” despite the fact that this claim has long since been debunked. He then related that he claimed that German-born golfer Bernhard Langer, a two-time U.S. Masters Tournament Champion, told him that he was refused permission to vote in the election, even though nearby, individuals described to lawmakers of being of Latin American heritage were allowed to cast ballots. Trump assumed that these people were not American citizens, and told the legislators that they were likely not legally allowed to vote.

The same day Spicer made the announcement regarding the voter fraud investigation, Langer released the following statement via GolfDigest.com:

“Unfortunately, the report in the New York Times and other news outlets was a mischaracterization by the media. The voting situation reported was not conveyed from me to President Trump, but rather was told to me by a friend. I then relayed the story in conversation with another friend, who shared it with a person with ties to the White House. From there, this was misconstrued. I am not a citizen of the United States, and cannot vote. It’s a privilege to live in the United States, and I am blessed to call America my home. I will have no further comment at this time.”

During an interview with ABC News on January 25, President Trump, reiterated his claim of widespread voter fraud and his determination to launch an investigation.

“We’re going to launch an investigation to find out, and then the next time… and I will say this: of those votes cast, none of ’em come to me. None of ’em come to me. They would all be for the other side. None of ’em come to me. But when you look at the people that are registered — dead, illegal, and [living in] two states, in some cases maybe three states… uh, we have a lot to look into.”

Though Trump cast suspicion on voters registered in different states, such a status is permissible under federal law. However, it is certainly illegal to cast ballots in more than one state during a national election.

Ironically, immediately after Trump began to once again beat his treasured dead horse about voter fraud, it became public knowledge that many in his inner circle are registered to vote in two states. On January 25, 2017, The Guardian reported:

“[Chief Strategist and Senior Counselor] Stephen Bannon registered to vote in New York shortly before the presidential election last year, after the Guardian disclosed that he was registered to vote at a vacant house in Florida where his ex-wife had once lived.”

The next day, it was revealed that President Trump’s second youngest daughter Tiffany is registered to vote in both Pennsylvania and New York, that his son-in-law, Jared Kushner, who also serves as one of his Senior White House Advisors, holds voter registration in New York and New Jersey and that a CNN KFile review of paperwork obtained through open records requests in New York and California Trump’s nominee to head the Treasury department, Steven Mnuchin, is registered to vote in California and New York.

The irony is certainly not lost, especially considering that Ann Coulter, one of the right wing’s most shrill foghorns, hired her ex-boyfriend, FBI Special Agent Jim Fitzgerald, to protect her from being prosecuted by the Palm Beach County, Florida Sheriff for knowingly giving a false address on a voter registration form and deliberately voting at the wrong precinct.