European Intelligence Agencies Have Proof That Russia Assisted Trump’s Election

Trump's caught in his own web of lies over jobs.

You’re for it now, Mr. President.

Not only has Donald Trump resolutely denied that the Russian government meddled in the 2016 Presidential Election, on January 13, 2017, shortly before his inauguration, he promised that he would deliver a full report therein within 90 days.

Of course, as of April 13, 2017, the 90-day period has lapsed, and no report from Trump or his administration has surfaced. However, that same day, The Guardian reported that Great Britain’s Government Communications Headquarters, or GCHQ, had observed shady interactions between Trump’s closest associates and known or suspected Russian agents as far back as the tail-end of 2015, having noticed the conversations by sheer chance during routine surveillance of Russian intelligence assets. For the next several months, the information was relayed by intelligence agencies in Australia, France, the Netherlands, Germany, Estonia and Poland.

Despite the damning evidence, Trump desperately accused former President Barack Obama subjected him to illegal wiretapping, making a petulant comparison to Senator Joseph McCarthy’s witch hunts against communists in the 1950s, while White House press secretary, Sean Spicer claimed that the bugging was done by the GCHQ, citing an unsubstantiated report by Fox News.

Because federal law prohibits US agencies from examining the private communications of American citizens, the FBI and the CIA have been slow to act, prompting the anonymous source who informed The Guardian about the interactions between Russian agents and Trump associates to remark:

“It looks like the [US] agencies were asleep. [The European agencies] were saying: ‘There are contacts going on between people close to Mr Trump and people we believe are Russian intelligence agents. You should be wary of this.’

“The message was: ‘Watch out. There’s something not right here.’”

Ironically, during Donald Trump’s campaign, he praised non-profit whistleblower organization WikiLeaks for revealing dirt on his Democratic rival Hillary Clinton, only to change his tune in February 2017 when WikiLeaks shared information about contact between Trump associates and Russian officials with The Washington Post and The New York Times.

It seems that before long, Trump may find himself with a lot for which to answer, and his numerous business failures over the course of several years will only prove to be dress rehearsals for his ultimate — meaning final — disgrace.